Tag Archives: leeds deaf and blind

Peter and the Wolf and then The Snowman

 

An enchanting double bill of family favourites, full of old-fashioned magic.

Peter and his animal companions are brought to life before your ears by dancing strings, quacking oboes, fluttering flutes and prowling horns in Prokofiev’s charming tale of courage and compassion. Narrator Pui Fan Lee (former Teletubby and CBeebies star) will guide you through this wintery tale accompanied by stunning illustrations on the big screen.

Christmas also wouldn’t be complete without a screening of Raymond Briggs classic, The Snowman. Howard Blake’s much-loved music remains the soundtrack to every child’s dream Christmas. Now’s your chance to experience the iconic score performed live by a full symphony orchestra, and the unforgettable ‘Walking in the Air’, here sung live by a member of Opera North’s Youth Chorus

Programme:
Peter and the Wolf
Interval  (16:30 showing only)
The Snowman

Relaxed and audio described performance (2.30pm):
Our relaxed performance allows members of the audience to move around freely, leave or enter the auditorium as needed; lights never go completely dark and sound effects are softened. There is no interval. There’s also a quiet room (the Corson Room) away from the auditorium available throughout. For the 2.30pm performance, the building opens at 1.30pm, the auditorium itself opens around 2pm and the performance lasts a little over 1 hour.

To access live audio description for The Snowman:
Live audio description for The Snowman can be accessed via the Sennheiser MobileConnect app on your phone:

  • Before coming to the performance, find the MobileConnect app in your app store – it has a black S shape in a white rectangle – and download it.
  • As you enter the auditorium, put your phone into aeroplane mode, and go to the app. If you have an iPhone, you might be already logged on. If not, go to settings and browse for the MobileConnect wifi and click onto it. Then in the app, click on ‘audio description’.
  • You can alter the sound by moving the blue circle with the ear on it around until you find a sound you’re happy with – this changes the EQ balance and volume levels. Remember to bring your headphones!
  • You can also put the screen into dark mode which means the background goes black and blue, so there is less light coming from your phone – recommended for theatre settings.
Price

From £16.06 – £28.62

Venue
  • Leeds Town Hall

Timings
2.30pm performance – relaxed performance & audio described/ narrated (no interval)
4.30pm performance – standard performance (20 minute interval)

Price Details
Band A: £28.62
Band B: £26.50
Band C: £24.38
Band D: £21.20
Band E: £16.06

Over 60s: £1.50 off
Under 18s: £5 off

Conductor
George Jackson

Narrator
Pui Fan Lee

Orchestra of Opera North

‘This is Not a Safe Space’ – BSL interpreted Performance


This Is Not A Safe Space
Jackie Hagan

Shows: Friday 5th October 7.30pm (BSL Interpreted)

Tickets:
£10 Full
£6 Concessions
£4 Discounted
Call 01274 233200 or email theatre@bradford.ac.uk
Get cheaper tickets when you buy online (tickets will be available online until 4pm on the day of the performance)

BSL interpreted performance.

Benefit cuts are hitting disabled people the hardest. Half of people in poverty are disabled or live with a disabled person. The future looks grim, so how can we get people to sit up, listen and care and not keel over with empathy-fatigue?

Award-winning poet and theatre maker Jackie Hagan’s way has been to make a new solo show that features the real voices of proper skint disabled people she knows. Jackie has conducted interviews with people from all over the country living on the fringes and the spaces in between.

These are not sob stories – they are well rounded lives full of the spiky humour and the complicated weirdness of being human. Jackie weaves these narratives together with poetry and anecdotes, celebrating the weird, the wonky, the unruly, and the resilient.

Expect audience interaction, DIY puppetry, poetic comedy, comedic poetry, and one underclass amputee steering the show.

Praise for ‘This Is Not A Safe Space’

‘Warm, welcoming and funny…this politically urgent show about disability and poverty is wryly humorous and affecting’ The Stage

‘a perfect antidote to programs like Benefits Street.’ Disability Arts Online

‘fierce use of humour teamed with passionate insight about working-class life’ Mancunion

‘honest, uncompromising, tough and tender – and funny – and rails against the vilification of the working class and the disabled, and their portrayal as either saints or victims’ Sabotage Reviews